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    Taking a look at your list of credits, it is clear that you have a passion for Sound. Where does that passion come from? What got you started? Mike McDonough : As a child growing up in Los Angeles our family friend was part of a children’s television show Saturday mornings on KTLA-TV. I remember being in the audience and marvelling at how he could talk into a microphone and every kid who watched this show could hear and see him in their own homes. He also did remote school choir recordings in the LA area, and I would go along with him and help set up the mics. As a result of this, I found myself at age 8 years old with a small battery powered reel-to-reel tape recorder going around the neighbourhood recording sounds. It just fascinated me to be able to capture sounds and keep the recordings. I realized even at that young age, I felt there was something magic about that.I soon found myself taking ideas from news periodicals I read in school and fictionalizing them into wacky radio scripts, and recording them with my friends playing the parts into my microphone. I’d then figure out how to take music and sound effects from records and make little dramas out of them. This began my love affair with sound.Meeting author Ray Bradbury as a young man at the Whittier Public Library led me to explore his world of fantasy writing, and after becoming friends with him, I was able to secure a grant from National Public Radio to produce a 13 part radio drama series called “Bradbury 13” for NPR Playhouse. That series won a Peabody Award, and got me noticed by a few people in the TV and Film industry. Soon after that, I was recording and delivering original sounds for TV shows being edited and mixed at Horta Editorial in Burbank, like “LA Law”, “Remington Steele” and “The Twilight Zone”. I even did some ghost sound design for Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead for a TV series he was scoring.At about the same time, I was privileged to become acquainted with Ben Burtt, who was just starting his legendary sound design career with George Lucas. Ben made a trip to my home in Utah, and soon we were out in the Utah desert recording bullet ricochets for “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” together. Ben also landed me my first film job as sound designer on Disney’s “The Black Cauldron”. To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading.
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading."When I started working in television, I became aware that zoom lenses can fill the [television] frame with an animal's eye from a great distance. Sound technology can't do that. There is no audio equivalent of a zoom lens. So I became interested in getting microphones very close - into places, a lot of the time, where you wouldn't be able to, or wouldn't want to, put your ears.One useful device for that is the personal microphone - the tiny microphone you see on newsreaders' blouses and lapels every night on television. You can get them into all sorts of interesting places - in the side of a bird's nest, down an animal's burrow, on a branch, or in a bush where it can't be seen. There are a couple of times when I've gone down to pick up a microphone cable to be told at the last minute it's not a cable, it's a snake, That's happened in Africa in very dark conditions.”-Chris Watson
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. In your idea of biophony, different species have different niches within the soundscape, but humans don’t appear very good at finding their niche within the soundscape. Is that because they don’t listen? Bernie Krause: They don’t listen. They don’t hear. I think there’s probably a cultural aspect to it. I’m beginning to guess that because these habitats are disappearing so fast that the pathology in our culture is increasing at about the same rate. If you don’t believe that take a look at the news. During Ronald Reagan’s political reign, he appointed James Watt to be his Secretary of the Interior. One of Watt’s first acts was to defund the Office of Noise Abatement, a department in the Environmental Protection Agency charged with lowering urban noise levels for health reasons. When asked why, he answered: ‘Noise is power. The noisier we are as a society, the more powerful we appear to be to others.’ Because the noise in our culture is anthropomorphic, mechanical and chaotic it doesn’t do much to help our sensibility about the world and the way we navigate in it.
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. Could you define soundscape?Bernie Krause: R. Murray Schafer, the Canadian composer and naturalist, coined the word back in 1977. The soundscape is all of the sounds in a given habitat, whether generated by living or nonliving components. The nonbiological sounds are wind in the trees, water in a stream, waves at the shore, and even the movement of the earth. These were some of the first sounds on the planet.As organisms evolved, they began to produce their own acoustic signatures, which had to fit within the existing soundscapes. At first, human-made sounds, such as language and music, were also in harmony with nature, but in modern society most of the noise we make is chaotic: an airplane flying overhead, traffic on the street, the beeping of electronic devices. These noises don’t have any inherent meaning; we know a certain sound is an airplane or a car, but the rumblings aren’t intended to communicate any message. This sort of incoherent human noise can have a profound effect on certain organisms. It can cause chorusing frogs to lose their synchronicity. It can mask the sounds of other creatures, who may miss their chance to claim territory or locate a mate. The disruption and confusion also create a perfect opportunity for predators to make their move.Once we accept the idea that the soundscape is a valuable source of information — an extraordinary narrative we have yet to decipher — we open up whole new worlds to explore. And if we want to think about our impact on the natural world, then we’d better listen to what the nonhuman vocal organisms are saying in response.
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. Do you have a favourite failure, as in something that set you up for later success in the studio?Bob Rock : I’m a sum of all my failures, I have learned from every mistake. For example, when I first started mixing and when I was doing my first mix I tried smoking pot, but it was awful and I have never smoked pot again. It didn’t work for me. Furthermore, I made a lot of mistakes as an engineer and as a mixer because that’s how you learn how to listen. When you start out you think it’s all microphones and EQ’s but you find out that there’s a lot more going on, for example, the sound source has to be good. You can’t get a great guitar sound with an awful amp and an awful guitar. You find out that there all these variables that you have to take care of.Also, how I got my first studio job at Little Mountain was through not being afraid to make mistakes. I had taken a recording course for 6 weeks, every Saturday, where I learned the basic stuff and the reason the engineer who was teaching us gave me the job was that I was the only guy who answered, when he asked, “Who want’s to try?”, said, “I’ll try.” I wasn’t afraid to be embarrassed nor to make a mistake. This was so key because at some point when you want something you have to say, “I don’t care what anyone thinks of me, I’m going to do this.”
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. What kind of tricks have you used from group to group to get a good performance?Eddie Kramer:The whole thing, it’s a game. How you build confidence in the artist, whether it’s the guitar player, the piano player, I don’t care, but let’s use singers for example. In order to build the confidence, one of the easiest things to do is to make sure that the headphone mix sounds really cool. Get that right and you’re halfway home. Obviously you adjust the atmosphere in the room itself. The artist has to feel comfortable. Sometimes they don’t want to look at you, so you turn them around and they’re fine. Sometimes the artist will say, “I can’t get the vibe in here, I don’t want to hear headphones.” Cool, bring them in the control room. I’ve done many vocals in the control room with an SM7, even with the monitors fairly loud. I don’t care if there’s a bit of leakage, if he gets the great take, we’re in.
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. “I always have to exceed expectations in the beginning, People go, ‘That’s strange, a woman in this job.’ It means I have to do my job better than anyone, to justify the fact I am still a rarity.Being a kind of exception is both a good and a bad feeling. Good because it feels empowering to be part of a ‘change’; I’m not only exercising a passion and a profession, but also providing an alternative to the status quo. Bad because it can feel isolating and uncertain, as I have very few role models to look up to. There are so few female engineers, mixers and producers in the industry that when I started my career there were moments I doubted my chances of succeeding. I speak to many young people now who are trying to understand how to make it in such an unpredictable industry. Lots of them, especially women, tell me that seeing someone like me successfully navigating this industry makes them feel more confident in themselves.”-Marta Salogni
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading."When listening to the reference mix you sometimes feel like 'Oh, my God, how am I going to make my drums sound better?' but that's more paranoia on my part. When I keep working on the mix I usually end up really liking the sound of my mix. I'll reference the rough initially, but at some point I will end up flying on my own, because when you're making decisions just based on somebody else's mix it can be self-defeating. There's this syndrome that if you listen to something often enough, it will start to sound right. That's the magic of many old '50s records, which weren't necessarily balanced well, but because you've heard them so often and because they contain great songs and great performances, they've come to sound right. I try to avoid that. If you allow the rough mix to cloud your own vision, you end up with nobody's mix. I like my mixes to have character, so that when somebody hears it, they'll go, 'Yeah, that's cool!’”-Andy Wallace
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