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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS “Commandment 3 Thou Shalt Work Non-Destructively Looping and multitrack workstations offer a completely nondestructive environment to work in. Sometimes, however, you are given the option to open a file from the workstation into an audio editor to make changes. The changes that you make to the file in your editor will be permanent upon saving the file and, therefore, destructive. Some workstations offer you the option of opening a copy of the file in the audio editor. The copied file is then saved to your hard drive with the same name as the original file, but usually with a suffix such as “Take 2.”  Always Work with a Copy In an audio editor, you are working with the original file. Copy the file, paste it into a new data window, and experiment from there so that you leave your original file unchanged. You can also use the “Save As” feature in your workstation to save changes to your audio without affecting the original file. “Save As” closes the original file (leaving it unchanged) and opens a saved copy of the file.  At the Chop Shop, we never edit the original files that we record. To begin with, the recorded files are backed up on network servers and also burned to DVDs at the end of each day. Next the files are opened in Sound Forge; then the editor selects the sound to work with and copies and pastes it into a new data window (pasting a file into a new window can be done in Sound Forge with the shortcut CTRL+E). The new file is saved as the final edited sound effect. Finally, a marker is placed on the section of the original file that was copied to keep track of what sounds were used.  Save Different Versions of Your Sessions When working with looping and multitrack workstations, save different session files for different mixes. This leaves a back door for revisiting a previous mix in case you head in a wrong direction. For example, if you have a mix of sound effects for a military battle scene and would like to change the perspective on some of the sounds, you should save the current session, then save a copy of the session and add an identifying tag to the name. For example: AMBIENCE BATTLEFIELD CLOSE PERSPECTIVE 01 , AMBIENCE BATTLEFIELD DISTANT PERSPECTIVE 01 “In the case of different versions of the same type of sound, you can just increase the session file number by one. For example: GUNSHOT PISTOL 9MM EXTERIOR 01 , GUNSHOT PISTOL 9MM EXTERIOR 02” Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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    What approaches or techniques have remained constant for you, despite all the changes in recording technology? For instance, it’s been said you’re not a fan of ambient mic’ing.
 Well, that quote was especially applicable to Siamese Dream (1993) by the Smashing Pumpkins. Billy Corgan and I wanted to put the sound right in your face – we didn’t want anything to sound three feet away, or five feet, or ten feet. With the drums, we did have some extra room mics, and we may have used a few extra with the guitars, but in general, I really found that if you get one mic, put it right in front of the amp, and get the right sound, you simply don’t need six microphones placed, y’know, behind the cabinet, around the cabinet, across the room, and all that. That’s not the case with everything: even on that record, on some things I may have used a tube mic on one speaker, and a condenser or dynamic on another speaker, and blended them together. But that simple close-miking technique is the sound of that record. The guitars are very in-your-face – they have a very immediate sound. That was the goal. I should contrast that with how we did things for the last Garbage record. There are a lot of weird, ambient-sounding guitars, and trashy, roomy drums. I record drums here at my house, in a very lo-fi set-up; I literally have a mono mic sitting in the hallway by the bathroom downstairs here, and it sounds pretty roomy, pretty trashy, but it sounds good. And sure, that original drum sound does have an ambience. What I find is that those room noises, that space, when you start running them through compressors, effects boxes, and plug-ins like Trash – that extra compression and distortion really brings out that room sound, the ambient sound, and brings a lot of character to the recording.
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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. What advice would you give aspiring sound designers and mixers as far as creating unique sonic landscapes and taking audiences to another world? Mark Mangini: It’s so important for young sound designers to get in touch with their own originality. I made the mistake early in my career of idolizing a couple of the great sound designers and I spent too much time trying to be like them instead of like myself. When you imitate something, all you become is something almost as good as that which you imitate. What I’ve discovered in 42 years and 150 films is that what has made me successful and happy in my career is following my intuitions and providing a fresh perspective to the filmmakers that I work with, rather than being kind-of-like someone else. One of the things I believe we did successfully in this film was what we call ‘expand the frame.’ We were constantly creating sound for things that the audience didn’t see. So often sound design or sound editing is a process where you make sounds for things that you see and it’s only what’s on screen. And that reduces what we do to like a color-by-numbers exercise. If it’s on the screen, you fill it in with the Crayola of that color, or that sound. We attempted, in a manner of speaking, to color way outside the lines in order to create this whole other world that was not something you were actually seeing. That's a big part of immersing an audience in a movie, and it was a big part of how we also honored the first Blade Runner when creating this new film.
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