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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. “Every singer is different. Some adapt to phones easily and don’t have any pitch problems. Then there is the other type who sings normally until he puts phones on. Then he drifts sharp or flat consistently. Each individual has to experiment and find out what works for him. He might need to pull one phone back a little bit to hear what is going on in the room. If the session is an all-acoustic bluegrass recording, then you can often go with- out phones. The musicians will gather around and let the leakage happen and go for that. Most of the things that I do, however, are a more controlled situation. I usually have the drums out in the room by themselves, with maybe the bass player. Everyone else is pretty isolated. A number of years ago, I did have a singer one time who was never satisfied with the cue system. He could never hear anything. One day he said, “I want to hear more highs in the lows.” I said, “I’m not sure how to go about doing that.” What I ended up doing was taking a stereo graphic equalizer and setting it up in front of him. I ran the cue mix through the graphic and said, “Here, have at it!” I let him EQ any way he wanted to. After the session I saw how he had set it, and it was pretty frightening. The level was even more frightening. Over the years, the consequences of playing phones too loud can be very alarming.” -John Guess
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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS Commandment 1 Thou Shalt Name Thy Sound Every sound needs a descriptive name. There is no visual reference — such as a thumbnail picture — to indicate the sound inside a file. Your only reference will be the file name. Be as descriptive as you can when naming the file, but try to keep the name down to a few words or abbreviations. Long file names do not always translate across platforms and disc-burning software. Metadata has given sound editors a whole new way to search for sounds beyond the file names. When editing sound effects, you should name the sound what it is and not what it was. You will undoubtedly find material that doesn’t sound like what was recorded but instead sounds like it should be called something else. Name the file based on what it sounds like. For example, if you record a bulldozer with large treads and it sounds like a military tank rolling by, name the sound TANK. Or even better, name the file BULLDOZER, TANK. Remember, the brain can’t see what was recorded. It can only interpret what it hears based on its memories of other sounds. This concept is your first step into the world of sound design. As you deprogram your mind to forget what it sees with your eyes and reprogram it to see with your ears, you will find a whole new dimension to the sound effects recording process. After some experience with editing files using this principle, you’ll find yourself thinking differently while recording. And more importantly, you’ll start hearing differently. Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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    f you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS “Commandment 2 Thou Shalt Save Often In the computer world, everyone is very familiar with the word “crash.” Just typing the word sends shivers up my fingers. There is nothing more frustrating than creating the right mix or building the right sound … and then the program freezes up, or even worse the computer shuts down. We’ve all been there. And if you haven’t, take warning: It will happen. I’ve lost hundreds of sound effects and mixes to computer and software crashes. Your best defense against losing your work is to save as often as you can. This commandment applies more to looping and multi- track workstations. A good habit to get into is to save (CTRL+S in most applications) every time you make a significant change to the session. This could include major level changes, plug-in adjustments, or rearrangements of the tracks. Some workstations offer automatic saving features and can create back-up sessions for you. Although this is great start, it’s not always a failsafe solution. Anytime you’ve reached a milestone in your work, make sure you save. Note: Saving a file in an audio editor can sometimes prevent you from using all of your levels of undos. Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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    f you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS “Commandment 2 Thou Shalt Save Often In the computer world, everyone is very familiar with the word “crash.” Just typing the word sends shivers up my fingers. There is nothing more frustrating than creating the right mix or building the right sound … and then the program freezes up, or even worse the computer shuts down. We’ve all been there. And if you haven’t, take warning: It will happen. I’ve lost hundreds of sound effects and mixes to computer and software crashes. Your best defense against losing your work is to save as often as you can. This commandment applies more to looping and multi- track workstations. A good habit to get into is to save (CTRL+S in most applications) every time you make a significant change to the session. This could include major level changes, plug-in adjustments, or rearrangements of the tracks. Some workstations offer automatic saving features and can create back-up sessions for you. Although this is great start, it’s not always a failsafe solution. Anytime you’ve reached a milestone in your work, make sure you save. Note: Saving a file in an audio editor can sometimes prevent you from using all of your levels of undos. Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS “Commandment 3 Thou Shalt Work Non-Destructively Looping and multitrack workstations offer a completely nondestructive environment to work in. Sometimes, however, you are given the option to open a file from the workstation into an audio editor to make changes. The changes that you make to the file in your editor will be permanent upon saving the file and, therefore, destructive. Some workstations offer you the option of opening a copy of the file in the audio editor. The copied file is then saved to your hard drive with the same name as the original file, but usually with a suffix such as “Take 2.”  Always Work with a Copy In an audio editor, you are working with the original file. Copy the file, paste it into a new data window, and experiment from there so that you leave your original file unchanged. You can also use the “Save As” feature in your workstation to save changes to your audio without affecting the original file. “Save As” closes the original file (leaving it unchanged) and opens a saved copy of the file.  At the Chop Shop, we never edit the original files that we record. To begin with, the recorded files are backed up on network servers and also burned to DVDs at the end of each day. Next the files are opened in Sound Forge; then the editor selects the sound to work with and copies and pastes it into a new data window (pasting a file into a new window can be done in Sound Forge with the shortcut CTRL+E). The new file is saved as the final edited sound effect. Finally, a marker is placed on the section of the original file that was copied to keep track of what sounds were used.  Save Different Versions of Your Sessions When working with looping and multitrack workstations, save different session files for different mixes. This leaves a back door for revisiting a previous mix in case you head in a wrong direction. For example, if you have a mix of sound effects for a military battle scene and would like to change the perspective on some of the sounds, you should save the current session, then save a copy of the session and add an identifying tag to the name. For example: AMBIENCE BATTLEFIELD CLOSE PERSPECTIVE 01 , AMBIENCE BATTLEFIELD DISTANT PERSPECTIVE 01 “In the case of different versions of the same type of sound, you can just increase the session file number by one. For example: GUNSHOT PISTOL 9MM EXTERIOR 01 , GUNSHOT PISTOL 9MM EXTERIOR 02” Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in Audio Engineering, Sound Engineering, Music Production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS “Commandment 4 Thou Shalt Copy Thy Media Files from Thy Sessions Some looping and multitrack workstations give you the option of copying the media used in a session and saving it in the same folder as the session file. This can be very useful for a number of reasons. Hard drives can quickly become cluttered with files, folders, temp files, scratch sounds, and other digital clutter. As a result, you might inadvertently delete files that were used in your session the next time you clean out your hard drive. Remember, a session file is just an edit list — it only points to where the files are stored on your hard drive. By copying the used media to the same folder as your session file, you are keeping together all of the necessary components for working with that session again. This also provides one convenient location from which to burn a back-up disc of the session with all of the media. When taking a session to another workstation or someone else’s studio, you must bring the media files as well. But sharing or transporting sessions is a little more complicated than that. First you need to make sure that you are not using a session file that has been saved in a version of the software that is newer than the software of the studio or workstation you’re moving to. For instance, although a session from Vegas 6.0 will work in Vegas 7.0, a session from Vegas 7.0 will not work in Vegas 6.0. You also need to verify that the other studio or workstation has the same plug-ins that you used in the session. If not, you won’t be able to use those plug-ins or effects.” “Copying media files from sessions is a perfect way of future-proofing your mix. You’ll be able to tweak the session or even add or remove tracks at a later date. And with 5.1 surround sound becoming more and more popular, you never know when you might want to revisit an old stereo session and remix it into a surround mix.” Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. SOUND EDITING COMMANDMENTS Commandment 5 Thou Shalt Crop Thy Sound When saving your sound effects as an audio file, be sure to remove any silence from the beginning and end of the file. This will save hard drive space and ensure that when the file is loaded into a session’s edit point, the sound starts immediately. Also, clicks and pops can occur when a file’s first or last sample is above or below the zero line. Use an auto trim/crop function to ensure that the head and tail of a file start at zero.  Multiple takes of a sound effect should be saved as separate, individual files. In the days of CD audio sound effects, multiple sounds were placed on the same track with indexes that marked where each sound started. When the files were ripped into a workstation, all the sounds of a track would appear in one file. This would create an extra step in laying the sound into a session because you would have to trim or cut the file to start at the sound you wanted and trim or cut the remaining sounds in the file. With CD-ROM, DVD- ROM, and hard drive sound effects collections becoming more and more standard, each sound effect is now produced as an individual file. There are a few ground rules for what constitutes an individual file. Sound effects in a sequence, such as a dishwasher that starts, runs, and stops, would be saved as one sound effect in one file. “A door that opens and closes would be saved as two files: For example: DOOR OPEN 01.WAV DOOR CLOSE 01.WAV A key inserted into a door that opens, after which someone walks through the doorway and then closes the door, would be saved as one file: For example: DOOR KEY UNLOCK OPEN WALK THROUGH CLOSE 01.WAV” Excerpt From: Viers, Ric. “Sound Effects Bible: How to Create and Record Hollywood Style Sound Effects.”
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