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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. We’ve witnessed a huge shift in music-production technology since you started in the early 80s. Are you surprised about just how quickly things have moved? Thomas Dolby: “In hindsight, it’s not that surprising that it has progressed as it has, but I would also argue that the most exciting time for technology was actually in the 60s. Anything musicians would play in a room back then could be recorded and put out as a record. Then, somewhere along the way, perhaps starting with Pet Sounds and Sgt Pepper’s…, recording technology got used for something other than linear recording and became a creative medium of its own. “You could do stuff in the studio which you couldn’t do live and I think that’s one of the reasons The Beatles stopped playing live, because of the big gap. Then when it came to The Dark Side Of The Moon, technology had advanced so that Pink Floyd could play Wembley and actually do a fairly faithful reproduction of their album. “Also in that period, when four or five people went into the control room and got really creative with the equipment, it really was possible for something to emerge that was greater than the sum of the parts and there was a sense of occasion about it. It was new or rare enough that any new idea or combination of ideas resulted in a new sound. There was a limited period when this happened, because, as technology became more ubiquitous and accessible to anyone with the motivation to mess about with it, there was a bigger chance that someone in the world would come up with the same combination. So, in terms of most exciting eras, my career did cover a lot, but I’d also have to take my hats off to the pioneers that came 10 or 15 years before me.”
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    YOU ACHIEVED SUCCESS RELATIVELY EARLY IN YOUR CAREER. HOW DID YOU DEVELOP YOUR EAR AND HONE YOUR SKILLS?Greg Calbi : In the early days I would say it was a combination of the intensity of work and variety of music we had coming in at the Record Plant. There was never a week where you wouldn’t have anything to do. You would always be busy. My friends kinda joke with me … I mean for 42 years I’ve been busy (laughs). When you do something everyday, constantly under pressure, and each one of the jobs you’re working on has to be approved or not approved … you are very motivated to get that approval. And if you don’t get it then you have to redo it and/or risk them not coming back. It’s a combination of the need to please and the constant listening and evaluating. It just becomes a part of you, which is the training ground. Doing it a lot in a bunch of different genres, so you get to develop some kind of a musical sense. It’s an abstract thing that is hard to describe. If you have the right attitude and understand your role then you’ll have a chance of succeeding. To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading.
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. What is the essential difference between the role of the engineer and that of the producer ? Mick Glossop: The roles are becoming very blurred. Coming up as a staff engineer, I worked with a lot of producers who were completely and totally in control; the engineer was there to realize what he wanted and it was his production. But I also worked with a lot of producers where I was getting into that realm, I was half producing the record. That happens a lot, as everybody knows. All we've got is a record or CD with the credits that say produced by Joe and mixed and engineered by Fred, but nobody really knows who did what. It might have been the keyboard player in the band -- who is going to be a producer in two years time -- who actually contributed more to the production than either the producer or the engineer. We don't have enough words to describe what people do when we talk about the way records are made. But if you're an experienced engineer, then you've got that direct experience of what mics sound like, what you can do with a combination of a mic and a compressor. You're just that much more familiar with how you can get a particular sound from a particular instrument so you can get it much more quickly. Again, in the sense that the sound cannot be divorced from the music, you're tapping into what's going to happen to that musical part directly. A producer who is musical but doesn't have that link to the sound has got to rely on his engineer to do that.
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