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    How do you stay in that mindset? How do you push yourself and stay creative? Nothing comes easy. What you're going through has been experienced by every successful top engineer, producer and mixer. Our careers are roller coasters until we figure out how to maintain our affluence. What comes naturally is a starting point. You take that rough diamond and polish it. I stay in the mindset because I love what I do and it's easier to do when I have great music to mix. Getting great music to mix is the part that takes time and patience to accomplish. It's all reputation and word of mouth. I remember thinking during the time that I wasn't doing as well as my peers, and thinking jealously that the reason they were doing so well was because they were mixing guaranteed million seller bands. What I didn't consider was why and how they got in that position of affluence. It's not luck. I push myself and stay creative because that's the way I am. I want to be mixing the greatest bands and singers of our time and in order to do that, I have to mix records that attract them to me. I'm always thinking about new ideas just like a songwriter is always writing new songs in their head. I'll be walking down the street one day, like I did last week, and suddenly i'll have an epiphany about a sound I've been trying to go after. Something triggered the answer. The way to get to that point is to exercise the brain to always be thinking about ideas. Eventually that muscle becomes strong and it comes more naturally.You have to find what comes naturally and develop that talent. It's not always the first thing you love. Since I was a kid, I wanted to be a veterinarian, but at one point in my young life, I realized I didn't have the makings, and music was becoming a stronger force in my life. It began as a drummer in a band, eventually it led to engineering and finally to mixing. I'm one of the lucky ones that found what they love to do and can make a living at it. A pivotal summer, many years ago, is still fresh in my mind when I stressed and struggled wondering if I would ever find something that I loved and be good at.
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    What is the first thing that you would want to teach people about sound editing? Read and write, because that’s the basis of any narrative. And if you can’t make sense of a narrative in your own mind, you’ll find it difficult to order any other type of narrative. That’s just my opinion – I mean, in my experience there’s only one way to narrate. There are many tools – the pen, paper, microphone etc, but just one way to narrating, because it comes from you and you have your own way of narrating things. What is it? Well, I don’t know, its different, you develop it, but if you don’t use the words, if you’re not used to writing them, the ideas get stuck. It’s not that you don’t have ideas, it’s just that you don’t have the right tools to get them out. When we talk about creative people it’s not that they’re just creative, it’s that they can order their ideas, put things together so that they become something new; they are just applying an unusual mindset, but actually it’s the same mindset that we use every day. And if it’s the same language, the same mindset, why aren’t we all this creative? Well, I think it’s just the difficulty of implementing ideas, on the page and in your head – like everything in life, when we don’t use muscles they atrophy, the brain too. Ideas get stuck and they never get out. You can use all of the other tools, cinema, the camera, the lens, the sound recorder, whatever you like, but if you don’t have anything to tell, nothing much will come of it.
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    “I have always had a strong passion for music which was my biggest motivator to work in this industry. I began as a DJ in 1972 and loved connecting with the audience on such a personal level. It was when I started sound engineering at a Club Valtur resort in Greece that I began to develop a stronger interest in the technology aspect of it all and that’s when I transitioned from artist to engineer.In the 80s I moved on from working in resorts and took a job with a small rental company in Rome. I was put in charge of engineering local concerts in town squares, pretty basic work. But with every show, my passion grew and so did the industry’s trust in me. I was hired by larger rental companies which meant bigger artists. I went from working with relatively unknowns to more famous Italian artists like Umberto Tozzi, Renato Zero, Antonello Venditti and Pino Daniele.“They told me was a Serie B sound engineer!”Serie B is the lower-division soccer league in Italy and the phrase is used as an insult in this sport-crazed country.Honestly, I wanted to get out of the world of live sound, change career paths completely even, but it was a bit unrealistic given my background so I settled working for a local rental company. I didn’t have much experience in the commercial aspects of the industry, but it was a welcomed change. The owner of the company approached me to work at Out in the Green festival where Aerosmith, Peter Gabriel and Rod Stewart were headlining. I was worried I would be disgusted all over again by the tension and stress that I was used to working FOH, but he convinced me that it would be different, that I could run a smaller second stage by myself. And he was right; there was such a calmness and professionalism. I did everything – monitoring, instrument setup, system tuning – and when the festival was over after three days, a colleague looked at me and said ‘Wow, that was impressive’. The moral of the story is that I had to accept that this was my true calling.”-Klaus Hausherr
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