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    If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. For people outside the industry, what’s the difference between an engineer and a producer? Bob Rock: Especially nowadays, it’s quite different. Back then, the engineers took care of recording the sonics, the technical part of recording. That’s what I did. The producer, at that point, was the overseer, the direction guy, the guy who worked with the artist. As an engineer, I translated what the band and Fairbairn wanted to hear. That was the sonics. When I made the transition to producer I realized I was bringing in more than the sonics. I was a musician, too. I was constantly working at it. I knew how to do it [the act of recording], but I really wanted to know how to do without interpreting somebody’s idea. I wanted my own fingerprint. I don’t think I was the producer I turned out to be. Mike Fraser was my assistant throughout my years as an engineer. I eventually realized I couldn’t do both as I became a producer. That’s when I’d get Mike Fraser to help me. In the ’80s, there was a certain sound that I got that people liked. I continued to develop that. That was part of my production. To be quite honest, each artist had a set of personalities. I had to deal with that. As an engineer, I could always be the nice guy, the guy who could hang. As a producer, you have to consider budgets, time, dealing with the personalities, and the songwriting. There’s another aspect to making music, especially with artists’ personalities.
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    To progress successfully into employment in today’s music industry takes a lot of hard work, focus, commitment and passion.Choosing to work in the music industry is not for everyone. It also requires a strong set of competent skills and a well developed ‘creative muscle’. We aim to support you in developing all of these areas during your time at DYNAMICS School of Audio Engineering .If you are passionate about building and developing your skills in sound engineering, music production, studio recording, mixing and remixing, mastering, listening skills, creative music technology, synthesis, sampling, creative process, collaboration and much much more, then you should definitely carry on reading. “Writing music and writing music for visuals are almost like completely different art forms. With music you intellectualise the music, what the instrumentation should be, what you are saying with the lyrics and so on. With music for film, you are intellectualising the project itself, the characters and the scenes. Tom [Popperwell] and I spend a lot of time talking about the characters and their back stories, talking about the personalities, anything connected to the subject that might inform the score. We talk about that kind of thing more than we talk about the music itself. I get into the characters, how everything links together and how that relates to me in my personal life. Then you’re allowing your gut instincts and experiences to inform you.You have to try a lot of stuff out, push further than you think, hold back more than you might expect, experiment a lot until you feel connected to the show and the characters. I’m not going to go against the scene, character or vibe if it doesn’t work for the show. Otherwise it’s just an ego thing. If anything, I’ve got an ego for the complete project. You can write an incredible piece of music but if it doesn’t work for the scene, it doesn’t work, full stop.”-Neil Davidge
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