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    What is the first thing that you would want to teach people about sound editing? Read and write, because that’s the basis of any narrative. And if you can’t make sense of a narrative in your own mind, you’ll find it difficult to order any other type of narrative. That’s just my opinion – I mean, in my experience there’s only one way to narrate. There are many tools – the pen, paper, microphone etc, but just one way to narrating, because it comes from you and you have your own way of narrating things. What is it? Well, I don’t know, its different, you develop it, but if you don’t use the words, if you’re not used to writing them, the ideas get stuck. It’s not that you don’t have ideas, it’s just that you don’t have the right tools to get them out. When we talk about creative people it’s not that they’re just creative, it’s that they can order their ideas, put things together so that they become something new; they are just applying an unusual mindset, but actually it’s the same mindset that we use every day. And if it’s the same language, the same mindset, why aren’t we all this creative? Well, I think it’s just the difficulty of implementing ideas, on the page and in your head – like everything in life, when we don’t use muscles they atrophy, the brain too. Ideas get stuck and they never get out. You can use all of the other tools, cinema, the camera, the lens, the sound recorder, whatever you like, but if you don’t have anything to tell, nothing much will come of it.
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    “The TG console from Abbey Road is an amazing board, it sounds great, it's very reliable, it's incredible. But bands would come to my studio because of that board and whoever had worked on it, whether Pink Floyd or one of the ex-Beatles working on a solo album. This meant that their expectations often were really skewed and weird. They expected their record to sound as good as whatever records had been made on the board, putting that burden on me and the console. I felt like saying, 'Look, a lot of famous records have been made on this board, but what made those records great was not the board but the artists and their abilities.' People freak out when they see a real Fairchild, and yes, it's an amazing compressor, but it's not going to make your vocal. It's not going to turn you into an amazing singer. It simply magnifies what you do, and if you are a horrible singer, it will magnify how bad you are. So to remove those kind of preconceptions from my studio, I liquidated a bunch of stuff and kept what I actually used to make records. As for the gear that's in there now, the studio is predominantly a vehicle for me doing my thing, so I don't need to have a gear list up. But bands are so gear-hungry these days, they want to know what compressor you're using and what mic pre, and what microphone, and while I appreciate the interest, because I was the same when I was a kid, when I am making a record with them I want them to be the musicians. I don't want them worrying about the gear, because it's not relevant to their performances. I just want musicians to tell me what they want to hear, as in more or less of something or darker or brighter. I prefer for bands to speak in those terms. Putting up a gear list, or even having close-up photos taken of my gear, perpetuates this gear pornography thing, as in 'Oh, let's go and work there because he has an U47, ' or, 'They have a Fairchild.' Who cares?” -KEVIN AUGUNAS
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